Breastfeeding Services

 



Additional Breastfeeding Information

Invest in the future: breastfeed your baby.  This relatively easy task will pay forward for many years to come.


For the mom, it is a convenient and cheap way to nourish your child.  Breastfeeding causes secretions of hormones, which give a feeling of happiness and wellbeing and strengthen bonding; promotes a quick return to pre-pregnancy weight; lowers the risk of developing breast cancer, ovarian cancer, diabetes and even cardiovascular disease throughout life.


For the baby, it provides antibodies and other antimicrobial molecules to fight infection such as flu and gastroenteritis, both common causes of hospital admission for bottle fed infants.  Breastfeeding also provides important nutrients for optimal brain growth and development – research shows breastfed babies have an IQ a few points higher than those bottle fed; prevents excessive weight gain and later development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.  Feeding premature infants human milk has improved survival rates dramatically.


Science has now proven what nature knew all along - human milk is best for human babies!  So why is the state of Kentucky, together with Mississippi and Louisiana, at the bottom of the ladder for both initiating and continuing breast feeding?  Fifty three percent of Kentucky moms initiate breastfeeding and only 28% continue past 3 months. 


The LCDHD wants to help you successfully breastfeed your infant.  Through a new program beginning in 2011, a breastfeeding coordinator and peer counselors will be available to help you get started, support you throughout, and aid in solving problems. 

Ann Stevens 


Ann Stevens, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, with the LCDHD is the Regional Breastfeeding Coordinator for the LCDHD region and can assist you with any breastfeeding questions, concerns, or issues you may have.  Ann can also assist any clinic or business with breastfeeding promotion and education.  Please call the LCDHD at 1 (800) 928-4416 for more information.  Additonal information can also be found at: Additional Breastfeeding Information.