COVID-19 News Brief & Vaccination Update 1.24.21 4:15 PM EST

To help answer questions, the Kentucky Department of Public Health has created a toll-free hotline: COVID-19 Hotline (800) 722-5725

Lake Cumberland District Daily COVID-19 Case Summary

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 9.93%.

Deaths: We are sad to report 2 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 316 deaths resulting in a 1.83% mortality rate (about 1 in 55) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.67% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

Hospitalizations: We presently have 57 cases in the hospital. This is 4 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 975 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.63% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.58%. The latest data shows that 95.56% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 39.66% of ventilator capacity is being utilized.

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 17,313 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 8.29% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 146 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 10; Casey: 8; Clinton: 6; Cumberland: 8; Green: 7; McCreary: 11; Pulaski: 55; Russell: 10; Taylor: 20; and, Wayne: 11. In all, we have released 93.7% of our total cases.

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 79 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 772 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,341.

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Medical Facilities. We have had 66 cases tied to Christmas gaterings, 43 tied to Thanksgiving gatherings, and 15 tied to New Year’s events. Of our active cases, 12% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 69 today: Adair: 4; Casey: 3; Clinton: 5; Cumberland: 1; Green: 4; McCreary: 9; Pulaski: 18; Russell: 6; Taylor: 9; and, Wayne: 10. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.007. This means our total case count is projected to double every 93.75 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases. Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 6 months -old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is released, resolved;
Taylor: A 51-year-old male who is released, resolved;
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 71-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;

The deaths we report today are: an 88-year-old female from Adair; and a 74-year-old female from Clinton who had been hospitalized.

On a positive note, we had fewer new cases today than last Monday and our district 7-day-average incidence rate went down slightly. Until the vaccine is widely available, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 17,313 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 348,479 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 347,836 statewide plus 643 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

COVID-19 Vaccination Status

The Governor announced today that at his Thursday news brief, there will be a significant announcement. You can watch his COVID-19 update via his YouTube channel or Facebook page at 4:00 pm EST.

We spend a great deal of our time of late explaining to people why there is not enough vaccine available in our area for everyone who wants one to get one. Here is an article that helps to explain the answer: COVID-19 Vaccine, Patience is Needed. Several people who contact us are very frustrated. While this is understandable, we ask for patience and to keep in mind: 1) we at the local health departments have no control over the federal contract with CVS and Walgreens, 2) the state Department for Public Health and the Governor’s Office, not the local health departments, has control over how much vaccine is shipped to providers in our district, 3) currently, the state is only getting about 50,000 doses per week to spread across a population of about 4.5 million, 4) the local health departments have little influence on how any providers, other than the health departments, utilize the vaccine they receive, and 5) we post everything we know about the status of the vaccination efforts daily in our Daily Brief, so tying up our phone lines and staff with questions will produce no more information than simply reading our Daily Brief.

The Lake Cumberland area will continue in Phase 1a of our COVID-19 response, but has now also expanded into 1b, first responders and school staff. Also, do not forget about the federal contract with Walgreens and CVS pharmacies to vaccinate the long-term care facilities and personal care homes — residents and staff. It is our understanding that almost every nursing home in the state has been visited by either CVS or Walgreens to administer prime/1st doses of the vaccine.

The Lake Cumberland District’s health departments are not pre-registering for future vaccination phases currently, as we have not been authorized to order additional first dose vaccines, nor have we been promised that we will be allowed to do so in the future.

The only prime/1st dose vaccines coming into the Lake Cumberland area at present are the 500 doses per week that are coming to the Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital. Also, select area providers (not the health departments) are receiving COVID-19 vaccine for the Adair, Casey, and Clinton County school staff this week. The week of January 25th we expect area providers will receive vaccine for school staff in Cumberland, Green, Russell, and Wayne, along with part of the school staff in Pulaski. The week of February 1st, we expect area providers will receive vaccine for the school staff in McCreary and the remainder of Pulaski. The push to vaccinate school staff will likely tie up most of the state’s vaccine supply during these weeks.

The school clinic in Taylor was provided the week of 1/8/21 by Taylor Regional Hospital and approximately 300 vaccines were administered. The school clinic in Casey was provided on 1/20/21 and approximately 150 doses were provided by Cumberland Family Medical. The school clinic in Adair was provided on 1/22/21 and approximately 200 doses were given by Cumberland Family Medical. The school clinic in Clinton was provided on 1/22/21 and approximately 160 doses were given by Cumberland Family Medical.

Following the vaccination of school staff over the coming weeks, it is our present understanding the much of the state’s weekly supply of vaccine will be diverted to regional, mass vaccination sites for the 70 and older population. These mass vaccination sites, as we understand it, will be provided via a state contract with Kroger, not through the local health departments.

As we learn more, we will post it.

COVID-19 Vaccination Phases

COVID-19 Vaccination Reference

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Quick Links to Statewide Information


Additional Guidance

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person: 1) between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet), 2) via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

  • Avoiding crowds as much as possible is your best way to reduce your risk.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water often and thoroughly.
  • Wear a mask when out in public.
  • Stay home if you have a fever or are coughing.
  • Increase sanitation.
  • Avoid touching your face.

  • Performing case and close contact investigations and issuing isolation and quarantine orders for positive COVID-19 cases and high-risk close contacts of confirmed COVID-19 cases.
  • Taking every opportunity to remind the public to individually observe COVID-19 prevention guidance.
  • Responding to complaints of non-compliance with the Governor’s guidance.
  • Consulting with long-term care facilities regarding best practices for preventing COVID-19; and, responding to positive cases.
  • Assisting businesses with their COVID-19 planning efforts.
  • Assisting area schools with their COVID-19 planning efforts.
  • Assisting area providers with COVID-19 vaccination planning.
  • Providing bi-weekly meetings to update the media and public on COVID-19 in our region.

Sources: KYCOVID19@ky.gov and Daily Lake Cumberland Lab Reports

Note: The charts and tables on our site may exclude “out-of-state” positives and positives in Kentucky with unknown county locations. The data may be a day behind while specific locations of cases are confirmed. Lake Cumberland’s information in various public information releases may not match the Governor’s numbers since our offices and his receive information on a different time interval. Lake Cumberland data on the charts and tables are based on what we know locally at any given moment. Please see our daily news brief under "News" on our homepage for our most recent local case count.

Regardless of local confirmed case count, we assume that COVID-19 is widely spread across all Lake Cumberland Counties.