Spotlight on Health, Nutrition and Fitness, Adam Capps

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Spotlight on Health: Adam Capps. Adam used the LCDHD Health Risk Assessment to gain insights into health and nutrition to assist with his health improvement goals. As a junior at Lindsey Wilson College in 2011, Adam’s doctor told him he would develop diabetes if he didn’t make major changes. As he started this path to health, he weighed in at 364 pounds. Using the buddy system, Adam partnered with a friend and they began going to the gym everyday. Adam said, “When your heavier than 350 pounds, not only is it hard just to walk, but to do any type of aerobic exercise can be extremely painful. I remember the constant leg cramps, blisters (on my feet and in between my legs), chaffing under my arms and around my torso.”

Though it was hard at the beginning, he became addicted to the positive health improvements. Adam says, “Right now I weigh 220 and feel great, but I’m definitely out of the healthy Body Mass Index (BMI) range, so my next goal is to slowly lose 20-30 pounds over the next two years. I’m just going to make slight changes to my diet and if I can lose 1 to 2 pounds a month, I’ll be happy with that.”

Adam’s diet revolves around lean proteins such as turkey, chicken and fish, though he does eat red meats from time to time. He also eats vegetables during his three big meals each day. He eats healthy snacks such as almonds, peanuts, pistachios and fresh fruits, prior to working out.

To control his portion sizes, Adam uses the palm of his hand as a guide. He eats three “palm” sized portions per meal, usually 1 to 2 pieces of meat and a side of vegetables. He avoids soft drinks, fast foods and other processed sugary foods. He also limits his dairy products and drinks 1 to 2 gallons of water per day.

Some days he runs 5 or 10 kilometers (3.2 to 6.4 miles). He likes to play basketball and golf. He almost always lifts weights and does cardio exercise daily, focusing on a different muscle group each day to avoid pushing his body to its breaking point.

“From January to July,” says Adam, “I did 500 miles of cardio on a treadmill and an assault bike. I try to stay as busy as possible, because before, my lifestyle was beyond sedentary. I used to have problems going up just a single flight of stairs.”

Use these links to learn more about nutrition and portion sizes and working out at home if you can’t get to a gym.

Don’t forget to check with your physician before beginning any aggressive work out or diet plan.